Traditions of Relaxation in a Stressed Society

Having you ever wondered about the customs surrounding Japanese onsen culture? Take a look at my blog to learn more about my experience at a traditional onsen town.

Montana-jin in Japan

Even in the west, we have heard crazy stories about the Japanese work ethic. Well, unfortunately some of these are not stereotypes but facts for many working in Japan. The Japan Times wrote an article in October of 2016 reporting that 1 in 4 Japanese companies admitted that their workers put in 80+ hours of overtime per month. The term karoshi refers to “death by overwork,” and actually happens. In 2015 the Japanese government recognized 96 strokes and heart attacks as work related. In the same year, the National Police Agency reported 2,159 suicides that were at least partly related to work stress.

But alongside this intense work environment lives deep seeded traditions of relaxation, one of the most prevalent being bath culture. The vast majority of Japanese people prefer bathing (generally at night) compared to Westerners who more often prefer showers. Visiting a traditional onsen (hot springs bath) is very popular…

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Week Fourteen: Moving to the Mountains

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See more photos and read about my trip at http://www.jacksondcrawford.com/cape-town-blog

My internship technically ended two Fridays ago, but my boss and I agreed that I could keep coming in to work through the rest of my stay. I’ve been in South Africa about three and a half months now and have two and a half more to go! I’ve been interning at a film company called Kalahari Film & Media with Michael Murphey (Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, District 9, Dredd, etc.) and making a documentary about renewable energy on my own.

I had to move this week, since my contract for my old house expired along with my internship. Luckily I decided to just spend all my time in the mountains, so I don’t even need a bed (hah). In all seriousness though I found a new place on Gumtree, South Africa’s Craigslist, and am really happy with my move. The house use to be a church before it was renovated to become a textile factory and restaurant. Now, after more renovations, the restaurant piece has been converted into a beautiful 6 bedroom home – and I’m one of the first people to live in it. It’s a massive space with an absurd amount of bathrooms (six toilets, four showers, and two urinals), a long outdoor veranda, a pizza oven, a courtyard, and two beautiful living rooms.

I’ve been camping a ton over my trip now that I add it all up. I’ve spent nights at Cederburg, Sandy Bay, Die Dam, Langebaan, Simon’s Town, Slangkop, and Kogel Bay over the past eight weeks. I don’t plan on stopping either. There’s so much more to see and everywhere I go I find something new and amazing.

I woke up on Sandy Bay beach this week after spending the night with a big group of friends. We drove to Hout Bay market for breakfast after gathering our things and trudging up the dunes, then drove back to Obs in time to see Julia’s art exhibition. She’s a young award winning American artist, definitely worth a look. Monday and Tuesday I got out and about after work, relaxing on Blouberg and Llandudno beaches. My coworker Monde invited me to watch a film she helped create through the City Varsity Film School called Sodium Day on Wednesday, and I went and watched it in lou of regular work. It was a very interesting film commenting on the school system in South Africa and how it prioritizes high income students over low income students, and what differences that creates in the youth. In the evening I took a short rainy walk above the Rhodes Memorial.

Thursday through Saturday was a flurry of hiking and moving. I went up Skeleton Gorge early on Thursday with Julius (Germany), Hannah (Michigan), and Simona (The Netherlands) and was amazed by how quickly we summited Table Mountain and the views from the top. We meandered along the tabletop for a while before descending down to Constantia for lunch. It was my friend Cara’s last day in Cape Town on Thursday as well, so I went to her favorite hole-in-the-wall restaurant with her, Chelsea, and Andi. It’s a place called YARD that is home to three different menus for the same restaurant (Mucky Mary’s for breakfast, Bitch’s Tit for lunch, and Dog’s Bollocks for dinner) as well as a coffee shop, and a biker bar. While we were there it was Dog’s Bollocks, offering plate sized burgers and wings.

Friday morning I got up early and moved all my things into my new house before the two and a half hour drive to Cederburg. I made it to Gecko Creek Lodge in time to swim and relax in the sun with the crew before we all cooked dinner and went on a walking tour of the property to check out cave paintings and rock formations. Our guide brought his drum and played as we climbed up the rocks to watch the sunset.

Saturday we spent the whole day in Cederburg. After waking up and cooking at the lodge we walked the windy and poorly marked trails that wound up and down the sandy hills until we found Elephant Rock about an hour and a half down the trail. Of course we climbed the rock and took pictures for a while then walked back to camp. In the afternoon we drove an hour deeper into the Cederburgs to reach the Cederburg Winery – the highest altitude winery in South Africa. The road was rough and steep, forcing my yellow cheapie to chug along at less than 20km/hr, but luckily I came out unscathed. Cat’s car, on the other hand, hit a nail and popped a tire. We made it in time for a tasting and a tire change then buzzed off to the Stadsaal caves.

Stadsaal Caves is a must see if you have time in South Africa. It reminds me a ton of Arches, Zion, and Bryce Canyon national parks. It’s an expansive area of badlands, caves, rock formations, and dunes that you could spend a lifetime exploring. It’s home to ancient cave paintings from some of the earliest known people in history and it’s actually very easy to navigate and climb around the rocks. Everywhere you look when you stand in Stadsaal is a brand new and unbelievable sight, from massive vistas of rocky and rugged landscapes to tight winding cave corridors. We stayed as long as we could, but as the sun began to set we had to drive back down to our camp. As we drove, a massive thunderhead rolled in backlit by the sunset. Everyone but the drivers were hanging out the windows in the rain hooting as lighting struck the mountains, overcast by the puffy red-orange clouds.

– Jackson Crawford, http://www.jacksondcrawford.com

Permanence

By Christopher Morucci (Posted April 12, 2016)

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The future has been on my mind quite a lot as of late. At this point in life it seems to be the bases for most things. I never felt a sense of permanence in my home town. I always knew that sooner or later this dance piece or production would be replaced with another. Going to college, even though quite a commitment, really only stays the same for about 4 months at a time. Then you’re on to new classes, people drop out, new students transfer, and a new weekly schedule gets slated. I feel overly aware of the temporariness of my current life. I can’t quantify if it is due to the fact that city life is constantly changing, the NPO has had constant turn over for staff, or the fact that my time sitting in the park under the sakura with my close friends, going on day trips, eating at my favorite restaurants, and even walking the bright streets at night are all marked with an expiration date that goes by the name of a return flight from Tokyo to Portland, and then Portland to Missoula.

It’s caused me to think a lot about what my future looks like and what I want to get out of it. I have twelve or thirteen tabs open on my browser right now with job descriptions at various organizations and their minimum requirements for application, none of which are in the realm of careers I would have pictured myself reading up on even last year. I set search requirements for “Humanitarian” and “Global” and “Mental Health” or “Counseling”. I pictured myself as a “Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Manager” in Nepal, or the coordinator in Syria, both of which require advanced graduate degrees of social sciences in one field or another. Then I pictured myself in graduate school. Pushing on to get my Masters, publishing research articles, doing both a pre and post doc internship. Finally being awarded my Philosophy Doctorate of Psychology. That person I picture is different from the person I feel like I currently am. It’s not in any obvious way, but still it’s there. I think it has to do with a level of mindfulness that I don’t currently have but hope to reach. He’s no longer the kid who listens to meditation podcasts while filling out excel spreadsheets at work. He’s the person that has dedicated a part of his day solely to his practice. He doesn’t walk around watching beautiful things happen and be afraid to put himself out far enough to make something of his own. He has a sense of understanding for other’s cultures that allows him to not only communicate fully, but understand people to an extent in which positive growth can be made for both parties involved. A person who’s things. But not a person that knows so much he can stop learning.

Accompanied by one of my roommates I went for a hiking trip up Mt. Takao this weekend. The whole experience was very much unlike any hike I have ever done before. The paths were paved. There were vending machines along the route. There was even a lift that you could use a train pass to get on if you didn’t want to take the time to actually walk all the way up. About half way to the top there was an observatory, which is to be expected, however, there was also a plethora of shops and restaurants filling the paths that felt like they came out of nowhere. Feeling like it was unnecessary to do your shopping for the day we continued forward until we reached a garden, a monkey garden. There was no way I was going to pass up my chance to hang out with these lively fellas. As a trainer gave a presentation I could in no way understand, my roommate and I flocked to the railing in order to obtain the best view possible of or primate brethren. we watched the interactions of the monkey community for far longer than two grown men probably should have. Afterwards we regained our composure and continued on our trek. Once at the top you could see the expansive metropolis that goes by the name of Tokyo in the distance. It was odd to think about how little of this space I have covered despite my constant efforts to get as lost inside of it as I could. It also reminded me of being back home in Montana and being able to look out at my surroundings from atop a mountain peak. It was comforting and felt familiar. Maybe minus the vending machine 10 meters away from me.

Read more of Christopher’s blog at christophermorucci.wordpress.com.

 

 

Nagoya Castle and Hommaru Palace

For my first FGLI blog post I would like to share with you my experience at the famous Nagoya Castle and recently rebuilt Hommaru Palace. I also offer my reflections on the experience. There is even an original vlog video at the end of the post 😀

Montana-jin in Japan

At the beginning of February the Center for Japanese Studies at Nanzan University arranged a field trip for all of it’s exchange students. We went to see Nagoya Castle and the recently reconstructed Hommaru Palace that is on the castle grounds.

It was a chilly 9 degrees centigrade that day and not everyone, including me, had bundled up appropriately. Just one of the many lessons I learned during my first month abroad. Even if it looks sunny and warm, it won’t feel like it due to the humidity. Because Montana is much less humid, it look a while for me to adjust to this very different kind of cold.

Before entering the grounds, our CJS guide broke us into groups each with it’s own tour guide. My group had an adorable elderly lady who spoke amazing English. When our group member told her that we could speak Japanese, she started…

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Track and Sign: A Different Perspective

My experience tracking animals previous to a Wilderness and Civilization trip with a world-renowned tracker consisted of spending time outside, seeing tracks and signs, and thinking little of them. From what I learned, track and sign has a lot to do with paying attention to what you see and using biological knowledge to interpret this “data”. As a science-minded person, this process of guess-and-check hypothesis development is particularly appealing to me. Tracking animals requires some knowledge of their life histories and biology, but a lot can be learned from simply observing patterns and guessing their significance. For a beginner tracker with good critical thinking skills, this process is appealing to me.

The November morning  we went out was cold and foggy, and I thought that I wouldn’t want to be a buck hunkered down in his bed at this time. In my down coat and hard shell, I was still cold in this record warm year. Yet, herds of elk and deer, coyotes, river otters, beavers, and magpies had been about in the last few days, their tracks remembered in the sand and the dirt during the warmer parts of the day. As the sun came out and we emerged onto the sandbar, I warmed up, and we examined the record of these species upon the sand. We were asked a series of questions about different tracks and signs. We were given time to develop hypothesis about each scenario, and then we discussed them as a group.

Often, I was not aware of the biological phenomenon or specific morphological feature of an animal that created the tracks or signs we examined; however, I found that I could more times than not hypothesize the correct cause of each phenomena. In many ways, this process mirrors the scientific method. Scientists create hypothesis that that explain the phenomena they observe without knowing their cause (or, in some cases, even being able to directly measure them). Trackers do the same.

Putting oneself into another’s perspective can be an important exercise. To track an animal, you must think from its perspective to understand how and why it did what it did, to interpret track and sign, and to create a narrative of its movement through the landscape. If we repeated this exercise by putting ourselves in the shoes of other people, considering the “how” and “why” of their movement through the landscape—literal or figurative—we might better understand each other. Increased awareness is always good, whether it cues us in on the actions of another animal or another human.

 

Blackfoot Challenge

I worked for the summer on a plant ecology project in the Blackfoot Valley. We had ten field sites throughout the valley, some on the Blackfoot Clearwater Game Range, some on land managed for waterfowl production, some on the UM-owned Bandy Ranch, and some on private land. These different sites were under different management regimes, and it was very interesting to me to observe the differences in plant biodiversity among sites. I enjoyed living in the Blackfoot for the summer, but I was unaware of the invaluable work being done by the Blackfoot Challenge and its partners in the area. Traveling to Ovando for a Wilderness and Civilization field trip, I learned a lot about the place I called home for the summer and was inspired by the effective collaborative work being done.

As a future scientist (in some capacity), I think often about how scientists can take a more active role in implementing management and policy changes. Often, regardless of science, the largest challenge in solving ecological issues is getting land owners and land managers—private and public—to change behavior and policy in order to improve management. In many cases, it doesn’t matter how much data there is supporting a certain solution. Without changes in how we manage and interact with the landscape, effective progress will not happen. Blackfoot Challenge is a great example of how a community has come together to make meaningful behavioral and management changes to conserve land and water resources.

Over 80% of the Blackfoot Valley is currently under some sort of conservation easement or other type of protection, which is unheard of. Worldwide, only a very small fraction of all land is protected in any way. Image the impact if this ratio were applied worldwide! To me, one of the most important factors here is that land in the Blackfoot Valley is under protection, but it is still able to be used by the people who live there to make a livelihood. Jim Stone is a big proponent of conservation, but he is still able to make a living ranching on his land. His process of improving grazing is largely trail-and-error, but he is taking steps to improve his grazing practices to improve plant diversity and wildlife habitat.

I think a lot about how we can change our interactions with the landscape in the interfaces through which we effect it the most—ranching, farming, and extractive industries—in order to improve ecosystem health. Of course, protecting land is important, but the large amount of land that still must be under use by humans in order to support our populations cannot be sacrificed. I appreciate how the Blackfoot Challenge has implemented many types of solutions—creating conservation easements, managing invasive weeds, restoring tributaries of the Blackfoot River, providing educational opportunities, etc. Together, these different methods achieve a much more comprehensive effect than relying on one strategy to improve ecosystem function.

The Rock Cult

The capstone of the Wilderness and Civilization program, in a way, occurs in its first ten days, which are spent backpacking through the Bob Marshall Wilderness. On a trip of this length, you’re bound to find out a lot about yourself, the people you’re hiking with, and the place you’re traveling through. Perhaps a little more than you want to know…

The trip began in the last week of August, still summer, though temperatures at higher altitude where we would be backpacking had already fallen. It rained eight out of the ten days, and we spent many hours with wet boots and clothes slogging through mud. The scenery was beautiful, of course, and there were thimbleberries along the trail to be had, but after a few days of cold and wetness that we weren’t ready for in August, our morale was low.

On the third day, our group leader came across a large rock (at least 10 lbs) with a hole right through it. He’d tied it to a string and forced himself to carry it around his neck as punishment for leaving his trekking pole behind miles before when we had stopped to pick huckleberries. Here begun the rock cult. The rock was to be called Lenny and the purpose of the cult was to convince others to carry Lenny the very heavy rock for no reason at all. Good luck, I thought.

By that night, Lenny had already been smashed due to foul play, so I figured the Rock Cult was over. Turns out, we found another nearly identical heavy rock with a hole through it just down the trail, and the cult was revived. Even the sound of the water squashing around my shoes couldn’t down out the sound of the cult members chanting what sounded like “E-R-S-2 Lenny-day. E-R-S-2 Rock-we-day”. Whatever that means, I thought. Couldn’t they find something more interesting to talk about? Wasn’t this supposed to be an educational experience?

By the end of the trip, we had gone through three Lennys (Lenny, Lemmy, and Lenora), all equally lovely large rocks with holes through them. There had been a Judas-style betrayal in the cult, recorded in our trip journal, the betrayer had been re-baptized into the cult using the water from a stream, and Lenny had thrice been murdered in some way (however you might murder a rock, that is). While at the time my mood had often been clouded by grumpiness generated by being wet, cold, and a bit hungry, I look back on this trip and the Rock Cult fondly.

As children, we freely make believe, changing the world we are experiencing before our eyes. When it’s snowing in August and you’ve been hiking in wet boots for six miles, who wants to talk about the current state of the world? What’s the point of laboring over evolutionary theory, or contemplating strategies of wilderness management? Part of physically removing yourself from society by getting out into the wilderness is mentally freeing yourself from its constructs. Why not, for that matter, create a new society where a heavy rock is King and you are to do his bidding?

 

 

Semester One Complete

When I first arrived in Tromsø, I had my giant red suitcase, a backpack, and a slip of paper with a name and the bus stop I was supposed to get off at. I knew I was meeting a man named Simen who was my Norwegian sister’s dad’s cousin’s son. I had never met or spoken with him before, but I also had no place to stay for my first night. I got off the bus to find nobody there. Pretty soon this man comes running down the sidewalk to greet me. He was helping an elderly woman with her groceries and then he didn’t see the bus come. He snatched my suitcase and we set off for his house. He gave me a tour of downtown Tromsø, fed me, and helped me figure out how to get to the school the next day. He fed me three meals the next day and then helped me get to my apartment that I would be living in for the next year. All in all, I’m grateful to have met Simen and to have his help for the first few days. I met my three roommates who happened to all be from Norway. I moved into my empty room that still seemed pretty empty after moving in my stuff. Part of that might have had to do with my sleeping bag and wadded up sweatshirt for my bed.

I had missed the international debut week which showed me around town, figured out my classes, helped you with your shopping, and let you meet other international students. Instead, I jumped into the Norwegian student debut week. We went hiking, hung out, and they helped me out with everything I needed. Here are some pictures from the campus!

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During my time here, my theme is to focus on the daylight (or lack of) and how the community copes with it. Because Tromsø is in the Arctic Circle, there are several months in the winter time where the sun never rises. When the nights began to shorten every day, it was definitely exciting. They gave a course to the international students on “How to Survive the Darkness”. We were advised to take lots of vitamin supplements, dress warm, and get outside even though it’s dark. There were celebrations to “send off” the sun and the city and houses were covered in lights.

The top left photo and bottom right photo were taken around noon downtown and that is about as light as it would get during that time. The bottom left was the tree lighting celebration and the top right photo was a walking street downtown. Everybody was particularly active and there was a lot going on during those months. A lot of people looked forward to those months because there was a lot going on. It’s also a time where you really appreciate and practice being “koselig” inside. The closest translation is probably cozy, but it’s more than just cozy. It’s that feeling of lighting candles all around the room, drinking tea, having good conversations with friends, feeling warm, and it’s hard to explain, but it’s a really good feeling. Norwegians take being koselig very very seriously. Up North, it’s a survival technique for the dark months. Here is an example of being koselig Christmas style. There are walnuts, Christmas cakes, and Christmas soda with family and candles. 16443947_1609563149070260_147529817_o16388718_1609563595736882_634924867_o

After the excitement of the dark began to die down, I did notice a difference though. Waking up in the morning was almost impossible because when I opened my eyes and saw the dark, all I wanted to do was go back to bed. I noticed that the students and the professors around me became less motivated and everybody was tired all of the time. It was interesting how hard it becomes to get outside and do things when it’s always dark out. The sun returned on January 21st, but we have yet to see it from the island of Tromsø because we are surrounded by mountains. Each day is getting lighter for a longer amount of time though. When it isn’t snowing or raining like crazy you can almost tell. I was lucky enough to have a month long break from the darkness because I spent winter break with my Norwegian family in the South. I spoke with a few international students that stayed in Tromsø during winter break (the darkest days) and they said it wasn’t great. They reported sleeping a lot. I don’t blame them at all. The day that I flew out of Tromsø to Oslo, the sun was sneaking through the clouds with the moon on the other side of the plane. 16442875_1609611809065394_1799507539_o

After a month or so, our days will be more normal again. Then the sunlight will increase about 15 minutes per day until the sun never actually goes down behind the mountains. This gives us midnight sun! Woo! All in all, the dark period wasn’t as bad as I had imagined. The Norwegians have adapted their lifestyle to it and made it something to look forward to. Depression is a problem, but not spoken about very often. However, they have lots of resources to go to if you’re not feeling well and they try to take care of you. My favorite part was the colors of the sky. It wasn’t pitch black, but sort of this blue haze. In the beginning and now that the sun is returning, we get these beautiful pink, orange, purple, blue skies that are beyond words or photographs. There are snow covered mountains and beautiful skies. Norway is very easy on the eyes. 14922989_1500662733293636_1904907192_o

It has been a very interesting opportunity to look at America from the outside. Norwegians are particularly educated on what is happening with our country and political system. To be here during the presidential election was very eye-opening. I was never interested or involved in politics while in the US. I almost felt guilty when the Norwegians knew much more about everything than I did. They would tell me their opinions on a specific manner or ask questions and I had no idea what to say. I started to educate myself and get more involved. I engaged in political conversations, asked questions, listened to opinions from many people of different nationalities, and then I filled out the form for an overseas ballot. I think overall it was fascinating to realize that the world seems much more involved with our politics than we are sometimes. I asked a few people (in the most polite way possible) why they cared so much about our politics and their answers were across the board that it affects them too. 14536572_1463436780349565_921227338_o

“We are all USA experts!”

While being in Norway, I’ve realized that it is very centered around helping yourself. You have to be able to motivate yourself. You don’t get help choosing classes, with the paperwork, etc. like you would in the states. That was very difficult in the beginning when I was trying to figure everything out. I had to step up and take charge for myself. This improved my leadership skills in a way that was more self-directed than towards others. However, in the beginning of the second semester, I was a leader for the new incoming international students. I had to lead them around and help them out with all of the practical stuff. This helped me with taking charge for others and helping them with what they needed so that they didn’t have to do it by themselves later on.

Being in Norway has raised many questions for me. I am constantly comparing my culture with Norwegian culture which raises a lot of questions. Fortunately, I have plenty of Norwegian friends to ask them questions about differences or opinions on different matters. It has also raised a lot of personal questions on where I want to end up and what I want to do. I do think I would be asking those questions if I was at home as well, but every day raises new questions and hearing about so many different views also makes me question where I stand on different matters as well. I’m so thankful to have this experience and I am so happy that I chose to stay for a year and have 6 more months to learn that much more.

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Athens, Greece

The end of 2016 blessed me with the experience of a lifetime. I was able to travel to Europe for a whole semester where I went to go to school at the American College of Greece in Athens, Greece from September to December 2016.

At the American College of Greece, I was able to further explore my Franke GlI Global Theme and Challenge. My theme is human rights and my challenge is women’s rights. I had the opportunity to take a class called Family and Gender Roles, in which I learned about women’s roles throughout history, how men and women’s roles differentiate, how women have gained more rights throughout the years, and much more. I believe that this class has been vital to me for learning more about women and their roles and how I can contribute to women’s rights. I am most passionate about women’s rights within the human trafficking industry. While victims of the human trafficking can be men and children, most victims are women. Human trafficking remains a huge issue today around the world, and even in the U.S.  I believe that it is important to educate people about human trafficking and to help others understand that human trafficking is a huge issue that needs to be solved.

Along with learning more about my Global Theme and Challenge, I was also able to learn about European and world history, to travel to places I have always dreamed about traveling to, learn new languages, meet new people, and experiencing different cultures. One of the highlights of my trip was being able to go on a sixteen-day backpacking trip to six different countries. During this trip, I learned so much about World War II. I visited the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, learned about Hitler’s rise to power in Berlin, and learned about the many victims of WWII at Auschwitz in Poland. Being able to experience our history, even the terrible parts, has been a great opportunity. I know have a greater appreciation for history.

During this experience, I believe that I have developed my leadership skills. I went on several solo trips during my semester and learned how to rely on myself during these trips. I am a better leader now because I am more trusting in the decisions I make, I have learned how to make important decisions that need to be made, and I am more confident in my abilities. I believe that I am also a better leader because I have come home a more open-minded person to other cultures, beliefs, languages, and more.

This experience has taught me so much. I think that I have been changed for the better and I am extremely thankful to all that have made this experience a reality for me.

 

New Zealand

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Eating lamb shank in New Zealand is one of the quintessential experiences of that country.  Everyone knows there are more sheep in New Zealand than there are people. However, on my last night in New Zealand, after my Beyond the Classroom Experience studying sustainability there, that lamb shank represented a lot more to me.

That piece of meat came from a farm in New Zealand, like the one I had visited weeks earlier.  It was raised on the rolling, green hills of the nation, cared for by Kiwis, as New Zealanders affectionately call themselves. That lamb grew up in the shadow of mountains, thrust up by the tectonic forces that shake the islands.  It never knew the factory farms common back in the states.  That lamb came from a place and a people where the environment stands all important.  It came from a place where sustainability is forefront and present.  It was cooked and plated next to local, seasonal vegetables in a restaurant lit by 80% renewable electricity.  The clear, blue water that the heards of sheep drink from is the same water that powers hydro-electric dams and ripples in the wind that turns electric turbines.

To eat lamb shank in New Zealand for me is to recognize all that I had learned in my time there, and all the work that is yet to be done.  What a wonderful time to embrace sustainability as my Global Challenge; it’s time to get to work!