My Experience in Senator Tester’s Office

For my Beyond the Classroom experience, I had the opportunity to intern in Washington, D.C. in the Office of Senator Jon Tester. I started my internship with very brief knowledge about the legislative process and the operations of a legislative office. However, within a couple of weeks of intensive training, I have come to learn the vast amount of accountability that a legislative office owes its constituents.

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One of the most exciting aspects of my internship was having the opportunity to conduct legislative research. On my first day, I got assigned to work with a legislative assistant who specializes in foreign affairs issues. For that reason, I’ve attended several Foreign Relations Committee hearings and completed some research on issues like the Russia investigation and U.S. tariffs. Specifically, I wrote a number of briefing memos about the updates on Special Counsel Mueller’s ongoing Russia investigation, the dangerous effects of President Trump’s tariffs on Montana farmers, and President Trump’s recent Helsinki summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. I am glad that I had the opportunity to study and research issues that are currently causing extreme conflict in the global arena, as this relates to my Global Challenge. My Global Challenge focuses on reaching global cooperation, despite the fact that many nations experience intense political and cultural differences. Overall, this internship has provided me insight on how the U.S. approaches global issues through the legislative process.

Additionally, a large portion of my internship consisted of constituent work like logging correspondence, giving visitors tours of the Capitol building, and answering hundreds of phone calls. Constituent calls were difficult to handle at times due to several controversial issues and bills at the time. The most difficult part of my internship was probably dealing with angry callers who simply did not want to hear the Senator’s point of view at all. However, it was my job to assure constituents that their voices mattered and that I would definitely be relaying their messages to the Senator.

Through the process of logging constituent calls and letters, I also learned about the diverse perspectives of Montanans. Although the current population of Montana is just over one million, the political positions and perspectives of people in the state varies on such a grand scale. Because Montanans have such differing stances on political issues, I began to understand the benefits of being a “moderate” within politics like Senator Tester. Although the Senator does not always vote in a way that will appease all of his constituents, he values the voices of Montanans and tries his best to reflect those voices in Congress. Also, through learning more about the Senator’s tenure in Congress, I soon realized that he is willing to work across the aisle in a bipartisan way despite the current polarization in the U.S. political sphere. As my internship progressed, I started to appreciate the Senator’s ability to put aside partisanship in order to enact legislation and effectively do his job.

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On a broader scale, I feel as though my internship experience also contributed to the working of our democracy. One of the key components of a democracy is the guarantee that the voice and will of the people with be reflected in government. As an intern, I was the intermediary between the constituents and the Senator. For this reason, logging constituent calls was fundamental to ensuring that Montana voices are heard by the Senator and reflected in his decisions within Congress. Overall, I’ve learned so much about the legislative process during this experience and I am hopeful that it will help me become a more effective advocate in the American political system.

Taiwan: First Three Weeks part 1

Every country is considered to have their own culture that is composed by their beliefs, society, and ethnic group. With the opportunity to travel to four different countries in my life (Mexico, Thailand, China, and Canada), I have been able to firsthand experienced many different and unique cultures. I believe Taiwan, however, has been the most unique culture I have experienced so far.

 

For the last four weeks I have been studying Chinese at 國立成功大學(National Cheng Kung University) in Tainan through the Taiwan United-States Sister Alliance (TUSA) Global Ambassadors Scholarship program. I arrived in Taiwan on June 7th, a few days before the program began, and will depart on August 8th. The two-month Chinese learning program includes many cultural excursions and a very intensive workload. Every day I wake up at 8:00am to attend my two hour Chinese class and then attend a one-on-one drill session from 11:00-12:00pm where I speak solely in Mandarin.  Also twice a week, I meet up with my language partner for two hours to practice speaking and listening to Chinese. While the language partner helps me improve my Chinese, I help her improve her English. Along with nightly homework, I have two quizzes a week along with a 報告(presentation) at the end of every lesson. Each week we cover approximately one lesson, which consists of two dialogues, 4-5 sentence structures, and 30-40 new characters. Over the past four weeks, this program has allowed me to increase my ability to speak, listen, read, and write Chinese.

Even though the Chinese coursework is intensive, the TUSA program also takes us on three culture excursions. Besides arranged trips, I also had the opportunity to live with a host family for a weekend in Kaohsiung. I have also taken several different trips with my classmates. Each trip I have taken so far has been filled with new experiences and has opened my eyes to different ways of thinking or doing things.

 

The first weekend in July, the TUSA program took us to Pingtung to visit a rural area school where Taiwan indigenous people live. These indigenous people used to live on top of a mountain, but in 2009 typhoon Morakot, the deadliest typhoon to hit Taiwan, destroyed the villagers’ homes and forced them to move down the mountain and build a new life. Three tribes were displaced due to the typhoon and built their new homes at the bottom of the mountain in the same community as each other. This new sanctuary with multiple cultures meshed together created a charming village in the hills.

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Lilly Evergreen Elementary School principle showing us the outside classroom which shows the children the importance of nature and allows them to learn in a new environment

Our project in 屏東(Pingtung) was to teach English to middle-school students. My group, which had 5 people, was in charge of  12 kids from age 8 to 12. All but one of the kids we taught already had English names. The first time we met the kids we decided the best way to get to know them was to play games. Due to the language barrier, we played simple games that could easily be explained and played; we played multiple name games, including my personal favorite, the blanket game. Seeing the kids having fun and getting closer to us as time went by is something that motivates me to talk to more Taiwanese people. If I can connect with little kids through broken Chinese, I believe I should be able to express myself enough to hold a meaningful conversation with adults back in Tainan.

 

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Day one Morning Class; Lilly Evergreen Elementary School

Reading and writing English did not seem to present a problem to the kids; however, speaking seemed to be a challenged for everyone. I was very surprised to learn that most of the kids could write clear, fluent, and correct sentences. Just like a middle school student in America, these kids could write easy English sentences without any help, aside from the occasional questions on how to spell a word or two.

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One of my students introduction

After the kids wrote down their self introductions, we began teaching them how to say the sentences they had written down. My first student Kevin (intro pictures above) was the best English speaker of the entire class. He only struggled with some words such as volleyball, steak, and brother. Other than these few words, he was more confident in his speaking than in his spelling. For the other students, it was the opposite. They could write really well, but when it came time to speak, especially in front of a camera, they struggled. This is is not only understandable; it’s also expected. If you put me in front of a camera and told me to recite everything I just wrote in Chinese, I would become a deer in a headlight that doesn’t know a speck of Chinese. Only having a day and a half to learn, write, and speak a different language is very impressive and brave.

One of the most rewarding thing from this whole 屏東 (pingtung) trip was teaching the indigenous kids how to speak English and one of the most fulfilling parts was the chance to learn traditional Taiwanese culture through the eyes of a 8-12 year old. The experience I had wouldn’t have been possible without the TUSA program arranging the trip for us.

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A model of a traditional Taiwanese home made by the children attending Evergreen Lilly Elementary School

To be able to understand a culture better you can do many things such as travel that country, taking classes, and living there. However, I think that in order to understand a culture in depth you need to have some contact with children. Children are still mostly influenced by their parents and the schools they attend. They haven’t had the chance to explore the world and be influenced by other cultures, just like the kids in Evergreen Lilly Elementary school. These kids are in the mountains miles away from any big city so they are reliant on learning things from the people in their tribe. Also because the school is passionate about preserving the culture, they teach the kids about their tribe’s traditions in class. In addition, they provide projects (like the one pictured above) to teach them about their culture.

As I reflect on the beginning of the first three weeks in Taiwan, I realize that I have experienced and want to share more than I thought I would. Through the TUSA scholarship I was able to experience a elementary school attended by indigenous Taiwanese people. Through playing and teaching the kids, I also learned a lot about their culture. So far, I have experienced many new things, which has made this trip to Taiwan very unique.

Adventures in the Southwest

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This is a remain of a kiva and room block built into the side of a cliff face in Grand Gulch in what was Bears Ears National Monument. You can’t see it here, but the area was littered with pottery sherds and flakes from the production of projectile points. There were also several remaining corn husks within the room blocks.

Over the course of past five weeks, I traded the cool, early summer air of Montana for the hot afternoons and cold evenings of the Colorado Plateau. For my out-of-classroom experience, I completed an archaeological field school under the direction of the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, a nonprofit organization located right outside of Cortez, Colorado in the very southwestern corner of the state.

When deciding how to complete my out-of-classroom experience for FGLI that would fit into my selected theme of Natural Resources and Sustainability, I, at first, struggled with the idea of meshing my own studies of Biology and Anthropology into a framework that could incorporate methods of sustaining ecology, while at the same time working to sustain and restore cultural impacts that are often the effect of ecological degradation. For my case in particular, the clearest path for me to explore both cultural and ecological sustainability was to study past Puebloan peoples here in the United States.

Archaeologically speaking, the southwestern United States is significant in terms of the incredible preservation of artifacts and features (immovable indicators of human activity, i.e. hearths, architectural structures, etc.). The fact that so much has been so well preserved over the course of 1200+ years, has allowed archaeologists to gather a lot of data about the ancestors of living Puebloan peoples.

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This is Cliff Palace in Mesa Verde National Park. Many of the artifacts, ecofacts (corn cobs, potentially cacao beans, etc.), and even human remains were taken from this site in the early 20th century and are now mostly housed in a museum in Helsinki, Sweden.

 

In addition to just digging in the dirt, over the course of the past twenty to thirty years, archaeologists have changed and improved their methods of study to include consultation with descendant indigenous communities. Crow Canyon is unique in the fact that it was one of the first organizations the in the United States to put consultation at the forefront of their mission statements and methods of inquiry. This type of methodology in addition to legislation like that of the Native American Graves Protect and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990, that states human remains and sacred objects must be returned to their appropriate descendants for the purposes of reburial, can make the process of archaeological excavation in the United States very tricky and it encourages archaeologists to maintain a positive relationship with current indigenous communities.

Luckily, for over 30 years, Crow Canyon has maintained a positive relationship the Navajo and Ute nations in addition to many of the 23 recognized Pueblo descendant communities across the southwest. The positive effects of this relationship allowed us to visit many unexcavated sites on both the Navajo and Ute Mountain Ute reservations and discuss the indigenous interpretations of what we were finding with native scholars who would each stay, travel, and excavate with us for a week.

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This is a ceremonial space, called a great kiva, located in the larger Pueblo Bonito structure in Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico. When this structure was in use, the top would be covered with a roof of wood and adobe, people would sit along the two-tiered bench, and the floor vaults were most likely used to grow ceremonial plants.

It was such an amazing opportunity to learn from native scholars and to understand their perspectives of the work we do and how the field of archaeology will continue to grow and change. I think the most impactful part of my experience was the ability to see firsthand how important it is to protect the cultural heritage of these people and value descendant opinions rather than conduct research behind closed doors. I hope to incorporate this into my FGLI capstone project by understanding the indigenous communities are almost always the first to be affected by fluctuations in climate and understanding that consulting these communities is extremely important in the context of any kind of research or development.

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This is our 4 meter by 8 meter excavation unit at the Haynie site on the last of the field school. We did all of our excavation at this site over the five weeks. We found lots of pottery sherds, lots of faunal bones, lots of flakes, a few projectile points, some potential wall fall from a structure, and what is most likely a hearth feature.

Wilderness and Civilization 2018

By Kyra Searcy

The opportunity to explore land use and perspectives in Montana through GLI happened to be through the intensive field course which gave me a minor in Wilderness Studies. This course occurred primarily during fall 2017 in the form of field trips between 1 and 10 days long, with a winter session art class, as well as an internship in a local water education organization, lecture series, and 4 day river course on the upper Missouri in the spring of 2018. This section of river is designated as wild and scenic, which nicely tied up the loose ends in understanding how land agencies manage across ownerships and policy changes. Throughout the year, our group was asked what we wanted to learn, and my classes were formed around those areas of focus. It gave us the chance to truly dive into things we cared about and ignore topics which we have already covered in other classes.

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Discussing Fire Regimes and interactions with homes/ people with Dave Campbell

My global theme is Natural Resources and Sustainability. The challenge was looking at resource management across land ownership in culturally rich places within Montana. Through my fall semester classes I was able to study these connections between historical land use to modern day land use through the lenses of ecology, policy, literature, art and discussion with leaders. We had amazing guest lecturers as well as professors who were experts in their fields. When we weren’t on campus, we traveled to a mine in Libby, a restoration site in the Mission Mountains Wilderness, a working ranch with conservation easements in Square Butte, the Scotchman Peaks Wilderness Study Area, the Yaak Valley Forest Council, a working homestead, and the CSKT Government. They worked to connect the dots between disciplines so that we were able to address large multifaceted issues that land managers face today in Montana.

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The Turek Ranch and Conservation Easement, Square Butte Montana

One of the most interesting and important perspectives that we looked at while on our field studies were those of Native People in Montana. Tribes have a deep understanding of the ecology and history of the lands that white settlers such as myself have only the slightest knowledge of. These traditional and ecological understandings of place have informed my own value of establishing yourself in a location and truly learning about it before making decisions that will affect it. We live in an age where communication across a nation can happen in minutes, and a decision that is made in a faraway capital can in turn influence other nations decisions on land management. Because these discussions can happen so quickly between people very far away, place-based decision making can sometimes be less informed and more catered towards whatever interests’ get the ear of a politician. I never knew how difficult it is to lobby for an endangered species or to change policy in the Forest Service Manual. These changes are slow, while decisions higher up can happen quickly and completely alter the future of a place. My classmates and I felt strongly about supporting indigenous communities so we attended the Rally for Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante Monuments in protest of President Trump’s decision to minimize and remove protections. After learning about large societal issues we wanted to actually act on one. This was one of the most powerful moments of my beyond the classroom experience by far. To be in the presence of various Tribal Elders coming together for the first time to protest the continuous neglect and assault of corporate and governmental interests on their sacred lands was something I will never forget. While we focused on small communities of native tribes, loggers, ranchers, miners, and wilderness rangers in Montana, I was simultaneously thinking about small groups across the world struggling to make decisions that benefit their local community while also benefiting the global one. I found it ironic that in an age of increased access to communication, we aren’t getting the word out about some of the issues in the wildest of habitats in Montana. It made me want to focus more on collaboration between agencies, organizations, local people and foundations which have ties to politics. We were able to see some collaborative groups and understand their struggles and triumphs which seemed really optimistic in the current political climate for land management. The most valuable thing that we can do in a time as tricky as this is to work together and draw upon our diversity of perspectives and understanding to make decisions that influence a generation of land stewards who are connected to the land and confident on their role in it. I am truly grateful to take all of these points with me into my career as a Conservationist.

Animal Rights in Veterinary Medicine

Unlike most of my colleagues, I chose not to study abroad for my Beyond the Classroom experience. Instead, I stayed here in Missoula and was fortunate enough to get an internship at Eastgate Veterinary Clinic. Eastgate Veterinary Clinic is truly unique in that it is run by a single veterinarian, Dr. Klietz, who not only treats dogs and cats but exotic animals as well. Having exotic animals on a regular basis meant that there was always something interesting going on in this clinic whether Dr. Klietz was diagnosing a torn acl or trimming the beaks of a parrot, I was always kept on my toes. In just the first week of my internship I was given the opportunity to learn how to properly hold a ferret as well as a parrot. While at Eastgate Veterinary Clinic I developed hands on skills such as handling exotic species, improved my knowledge of diagnosing and treating animals, and the importance of customer service.

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For my global theme of social inequality and human rights, I focused on promoting and spreading education awareness of animal rights. Luckily I was able to do this on a regular basis through customer service. Customer service at Eastgate involved doing call backs, checking clients in, listening to client’s issues, and getting to know your clients personally. Talking to clients on a regular basis gave me many opportunities to discuss how they felt about their pet’s worth outside of their usefulness towards the owners. For the most part many people stated that they would do anything for their pet to live a life without pain or suffering. However, once money was involved a lot of these individuals’ values changed. Many clients refused the best treatment for their pet and some would even walk out of the clinic without getting any treatment regardless of their pet’s condition. Dr. Klietz informed me after some time that this is a constant battle for veterinarians to deal with but he had a great solution for these situations. Over the next few days after a client had left the clinic, Dr. Klietz would have other staff members and I do call backs and try to get the animal the care it needs. The goal of these callbacks was to find common values with the owners in relation to how important their pet is to them then urge the owner to reconsider any treatment that would help their pet. Doing these types of tasks made me question if a common ground will ever be met between an animal’s life or money.

My beyond the classroom experience has immensely pushed my leadership goals. Working in a clinic with a single doctor, it is imperative that you do your tasks right every time. This stress helped push me to be more confident as an individual as well as a leader. In addition, customer service has given me insight on the broad spectrum of concerns clients and people go through on a daily basis and helped me develop higher standards in regards to building relationships and listening to others. I cannot thank Dr. Klietz and his staff enough for the amazing opportunity they have given me.

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First Look at Barcelona, Spain

I am coming from the small mountainous collage town of Missoula, Montana.  Nestled in the mountains with a population of 72,000, it’s a spunky little town that I absolutely love.

Now I am halfway across the world. Barcelona is like another planet. The city is massive and people are constantly moving, weaving, buying, drinking, talking, laughing, and making their way through the day. Walking down Las Ramblas, there are small pop up carts selling fun touristy trinkets for as far as the eye can see.  The buildings aren’t skyscrapers, like I thought. Instead they stand five to fifteen stories high with beautiful sand colored exteriors, and large framed windows.

A building by the famous 1900’s architect, Antoni Gaudi. 

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Perhaps one of the most well known staples of Barcelona, The Sagrada Familia.  This magnificent church was planned by Gaudi, but it wasn’t built until after his death, and is still being built today. 

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Branching from different squares throughout Barcelona, long, narrow alleys connect, creating a massive, ominous maze. 

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A square near Barcelona’s city center. Palm trees and other vivid greenery is everywhere. 

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 The Bunkers del Carmel sit atop on of the higher hills in Barcelona. After a short uphill walk, these abandoned anti aircraft ruins offer a spectacular view of Barcelona. 

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Throughout the city, there seems to be a theme of yellow. Yellow ribbons gently wave in the wind from a fourth story balcony.  The Catalonia flag is everywhere. In the same folded shape as the breast cancer awareness symbol, I can sometimes spot a small yellow ribbon pinned to a passerby’s jacket. Barcelona is part of a north eastern region of Spain called Catalonia. This yellow propaganda symbolizes support for Catalonia’s independence from Spain, among other things. I strongly recommend reading about the political happenings between Spain and Catalonia. More on this later.

A protest gathers on an intersection in Barcelona. Yellow is everywhere. People make noise by talking, yelling, banging pots, ringing bells, or blowing whistles. Police cars, blue lights spinning, redirect traffic by blocking the streets that lead to the protest. 

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These first two weeks in Barcelona have shown me how much the world has to offer. I thought I could be content forever, nestled in the  mountains of the northwestern United Sates. This city has shown me how small I am. The world is teeming with people, culture, food, history, and every place offers an exquisite taste of humanity.

Trading the Rockies for Highlands

My beyond the classroom experience took place during the fall semester of 2017. I traveled to the University of Dundee in Dundee, Scotland. The area is characterized by luscious green forests, rough mountainous landscapes and beautiful ocean views. Dundee is an hour north from the capital, Edinburgh, and only twenty minutes from the prestigious campus, the University of St. Andrews. The region is a special place in Scotland, holding its own unique accent (the Dundonian accent), which is among the hardest for Americans to interpret. Though the accents are tough to understand sometimes, the people of Scotland are among the kindest and most caring in the world.

At my host university I took a variety of classes connecting to my major and GLI global theme. My major is Physical Geography with a minor in computer science and certificate in Geographical information systems (GIS) and the global theme I am apart of is Technology and Society. The global theme I chose focuses on the how organizations harness technology and data and acknowledges how important technology is as a tool to inform and teach people new ideas across the world. This theme relates to my beyond the classroom experience because while abroad I took classes that required research and data modeling to explain societal differences in health, behavior and economic inequalities. The professional and academic skills I acquired during my experience included many field surveys and expeditions to grow my skills in obtaining data. I also secured my knowledge in modeling and presenting data to others. On many occasions my experience required that I become a leader, my course mates and I often worked in teams to gather and present data, so it required someone to step up and take the lead. Becoming a leader was a new concept for me but was formed and structured due to the GLI Leadership retreat I attended before I left for my beyond the classroom experience.

This experience pushed me out of my comfort zone and helped me grow professionally and academically. The curriculum was much different than in the United States so gaining an outside perspective on the way other cultures learn was incredibly enriching. Among the most enriching experiences I had was taking a field trip to the Scottish Highlands to obtain geomorphological data on a former glaciated landscape. There we gathered data from the landscape to build a map representing how the glacier might have looked 11,000 years ago. Through adventures like that field trip and spontaneous adventures in Scotland, this experience provided me with amazing adventures and lifelong friends. I will hold on to the memories forever. If you or anyone you know is ever thinking about visiting Scotland, do it. It will be the best decision you’ve ever made.

 

Buenos Aires: The City that Constantly Evolves

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By Christa Street

Studying abroad is the epitome of independence. The confidence and knowledge gained from living abroad in a multifaceted culture is an invaluable experience that has made me a better, more fearless, college student. Buenos Aires, the city I selected for my GLI experience, is a diverse and intense city, and I gained just as much knowledge outside the classroom as I did behind a desk.

Inside the classroom, I gained knowledge of social inequality and human rights conditions throughout Latin America through classes of international and regional politics. Discussing the current state of American politics to Argentinian students sparked debate and passionate discussions, which helped me to understand a variety of Latin American perspectives regarding social issues throughout the Americas.

Outside the classroom, I met people from across Latin America who had left their respective countries due to poor economic conditions or political instability. Protests advocating for the rights of indigenous communities, as well as demonstrations against Argentina’s military dictatorship, which ended 40 years ago, were commonplace in a city whose citizens are passionate for social change. My host mother survived the dictatorship and told me stories of the state of fear and oppression she lived when she was a teenager. The variety of interactions and stories I experienced put my GLI theme of social inequality and human rights into context.

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Integration into the rapid dynamics and vibrant culture of Buenos Aires challenged me to live in a way I had never known before. Five months in Buenos Aires changed my entire lifestyle and leadership skills simply by making me a more confident person. I didn’t learn only from professors, students, locals and foreign residents. I taught myself how to be adaptable while living abroad, and that is a skill I will depend on for the rest of my life.

From White Bark Pines to Prairie Dogs

I spent the fall of 2017 traveling over 1,500 miles throughout central Montana in a van, in a kayak, or on my own two feet with The Wild Rockies Field Institute (WRFI). Central Montana is an ecologically and culturally distinct landscape. I wanted to experience diverse environments and the people intimately connected with them. I hoped to gain a more personalized and less academic perspective on our current global ecological crisis in a localized fashion. I was constantly challenged by my instructors, peers, guest speakers, and our reading material.

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Everything I expected from WRFI was exceeded. I felt ultra comfortable in the woods, on wild rivers, and in the prairie, even spending a full 24 hours completely alone in the back- country. Two months of living in a tent together, and a group of 10 strangers quickly becomes your family. Daily classes on mountain tops and along rivers allowed me to engage deeply with material and my peers. I had the chance to think critically about why I had the point of view I did. Something so simple, but important for anyone.

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One specific issue challenged myself and the group more than any other. We were discussing the pros and cons of a proposed mine outside of White Sulphur Springs, Montana. On one hand this mine threatens one of the most iconic rivers in Montana, the Smith River. On the other hand, it would bring jobs to one of the poorest counties in the country and is heralded as one of the most advanced mines of its kind. We met with both mine supporters and opponents. We visited the site of the mine and the Smith River. We felt the need in the community for this project, the hope it brought, but we also felt the beauty and magnificence of the Smith River and its surrounding ecosystem. At the end of the day, we were conflicted, despite being well-informed. But that is the crux of complicated issues, its more than the facts, our values also play in integral role in our decisions about how we think the world should look.

At the end of WRFI I found myself thinking that all environmental issues aren’t simply about landscapes and ecosystems, but the human layer that is inevitably nested within them as well. There are no black and white issues, good and bad guys. There are humans trying to provide the best lives for themselves, their families, and hopefully the earth.

Out of the Classroom, Still in Missoula (and loving it)

In High School, I studied abroad in Peru for a month of the summer of 2012. The experience was breathtaking. I learned more Spanish in a single month than I ever could have in the classroom, my understanding of other cultures and the U.S. expanded and I found greater confidence in myself. I joined GLI three years ago because I wanted to study abroad again. The essence of a study abroad experience is in its challenge to understand another culture and foreign environment and so I couldn’t imagine discovering that kind of experience here in the United States, let alone Missoula. And yet, I chose to fulfill my Out of Classroom experience right here in Missoula and feel that I have learned more about the world and myself than expected. I am working with Congolese refugees relocated here last September, helping them direct their own short films under the New Neighbors Project. This month two of those refugee directed films and the feature-length documentary of the project as a whole premieres (check the New Neighbors Project Facebook page or website, newneighborsmedia.org, for details) at the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival!

The experience has pushed me to grow emotionally and professionally. Working within the nuances of a different cultural mindset requires an open heart, forgiveness and patience. Working with trauma requires empathy, but clear boundaries. My technical skills have improved and I’ve gained confidence in my abilities after working with a team of established filmmakers. I feel equipped to address my global theme, Social Inequality and Human Rights, beyond the scope of the New Neighbors Project. My challenge against Social Inequality and Human Rights is to think globally and act locally. I can see the positive impact this project is having on the refugee crisis and I see positive changes for the Missoula community. I met once a week with one of the directors to talk film and help with the camera, but I also helped him develop his English, practice driving (he passed the driver’s ed test on the first try!) and explore the city and community of Missoula. In this exchange I’ve acquired the tangible skills of some Swahili and French conversation and the recipes for ugali and sweet breads. Most importantly I’ve learned how to navigate the tricky ground of mistranslated conversations, informed consent and transparency in how to admit failure and celebrate success.

I want to encourage other students to complete their Out of the Classroom experience here in Missoula. The refugees need a lot of help and resources, but the call to action has seen an increase in programs and projects (like New Neighbors) that is strengthening our community and pushing us all to grow as a support network. This project has a huge production team and works closely with multiple organizations in Missoula to provide a well-rounded support network to the refugees. I am confident that there is just as much effort put towards other global issues like Climate Change and poverty at the local level here. After all, there are more than 1,200 registered local non-profits in Missoula. The director I work most closely with told me the other day that “Missoula is my home now”. I cannot express how strongly his words affect me. I am proud of Missoula and feel strength in this community to tackle global issues, one day at a time.